A Glimpse of the Past

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Around 1610 Sir John Hume, a younger son of a Scottish border landowner, came to Ireland and settled in County Fermanagh where both he and his brother Alexander were granted plots of land. Alexander Hume subsequently sold his share to Sir John who added further acreage to have become the largest holder of land in this part of the country by the time of his death in 1639. Before that date he built ‘a fair strong castle’ at Tully on the edge of Lower Lough Erne: it was attacked and burnt by the Maguires in Christmas 1641 and thereafter has remained a ruin. Nevertheless the Humes held onto their property, which passed to Sir John’s son George, created a baronet in 1671. He in turn was succeeded by his son, another Sir John Hume who further added to the size of his estate by marrying Sidney, daughter and co-heiress of James Hamilton, of Manorhamilton, County Leitrim. Thus their only son, Sir Gustavus Hume was an exceedingly wealthy man when around 1728 he decided to embark on building a new residence for himself in County Fermanagh.

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The architect Sir Gustavus Hume chose to design his new house is today known as Richard Castle, although thanks to research by Loreto Calderón and Konrad Dechant published in 2010 we now know his real name was David Richardo. Raised in Dresden where his father worked for the Elector of Saxony, he had moved first to England before coming to this country where one of his earliest jobs was working on engineering projects, notably the building of the Newry Canal: overseen by Sir Edward Lovett Pearce this was the first inland navigation on these islands. It must be presumed that Hume, who was associated with the Newry Canal project, had met Castle in England and invited him to Ireland. Whatever the exact details, Castle Hume – as the new house was named – is deemed to have been Castle’s first architectural project here. Unfortunately we do not know what the main building looked like since it has long since disappeared. When Sir Gustavus Hume died in 1731, his estates were divided between two daughters, one of whom Mary married Nicholas Loftus, future first Earl of Ely, whose family already owned property elsewhere. As a result, Castle Hume seems to have been little used. An estate map of 1768 shows a relatively small classical structure of three storeys with a pedimented centre and sculptures along the roof balustrade. When the Rev Richard Twiss visited the region in 1775, it was still the most ‘conspicuous’ seat adorning Lough Erne and the following year Arthur Young exclaimed, ‘What a spot to build on and form a retreat from the business and anxiety of the world.’ The building is sometimes reported to have been a ruin by 1793, but this seems unlikely as it was let from c.1791 to 1797 to Hugh Montgomery of Derrygonnelly, and early in the following century the landscape architect John Sutherland, a follower of ‘Capability’ Brown, worked on the grounds. It is believed that in the 1830s when the second Marquess of Ely decided to build a residence on a lakeside promontory a couple of miles away, he used the cut-stone from Castle Hume for this purpose, leading to the obliteration of Castle’s domestic work.

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The main block of Castle Hume may be gone but parts of the stable yard, seen here (photographed on a very wet evening) still remain to provide tantalising hints of what has been lost. Two blocks face each other across a wide courtyard, one of them L-shaped and containing the stables with elliptical vaulted ceilings supported by an arcade of granite Tuscan columns resting on round drums. Of two storeys, the exterior of both buildings is of harled brick with cut limestone employed for the massive window- and doorcases, as well as in the first-floor oculi. The blocks are linked by a single-storey range in cut-stone which appears to be of later date. So too most likely is the only other structure of the original Castle Hume estate: an octagonal dovecote located on rising ground nearby. Topped by a lantern with openings through which birds could enter, the dovecote’s brick interior features hundreds of small square nesting spaces. This building has recently been restored by the present owners of Castle Hume and now looks much as it would have done when first constructed more than 250 years ago. Together with the stables, it provides a glimpse into the past, a suggestion of the lakeside property that once so enchanted both Twiss and Young.

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One comment on “A Glimpse of the Past

  1. David O'Grady says:

    Robert, when next in Dublin you may be interested in seeing/photographing an original side gate that was unearthed in the wall of the Deanery of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Kevin St.

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