Going to Waste

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An older set of stables on the former Dartrey estate in County Monaghan has already been shown here (see Now Unstable, October 1st 2014). While the rapidly deteriorating condition of that structure renders it most likely beyond redemption, the same is not true of the 19th century block shown above. Although sections of the slating have gone, the walls are very solidly constructed and the entire site could easily be restored and converted into handsome offices or homes. Such is the norm elsewhere for buildings no longer required for their original purpose but capable of adaptation. Not to take such an approach with these stables is to squander a resource. All that is needed is the kind of imagination far too seldom seen in this country…

7 comments on “Going to Waste

  1. Penelope Bianchi says:

    Oh I hope someone sees this who sees what you see!! And can do something!!

  2. Colm O'Leary says:

    “All that is needed is the kind of imagination far too seldom seen in this country…” And someone with pots of money to throw at the project so that it’s done properly, or, if they don’t have the required funds, the willingness to part with it to someone that does.

    All through this country in the last two decades beautiful properties ran to rack and ruin while their owners sat on them, dog in the manger like, watching site values rise and rise while buildings fell down.

    • Thank you, yes I am afraid the points you make are all too true. Still worse, listed buildings which should benefit from protection are allowed to fall into ruin because the relevant authority is unwilling to engage in enforcement. Thus our stock of architectural heritage continues to be frittered away…

  3. Kurt NEUENSCHWANDER says:

    Dear Sir’

    I follow your most interesting articles since about a year. Often I wondered if you could not supply people interested in the upkeep

    of endangered buildings with a list. Does somthing like this exists? If so, please let me know.

    Best regards

    Kurt Neuenschwander

    > Message du 07/01/15 05:31 > De : “The Irish Aesthete” > A : kurt.neuenschwander@wanadoo.fr > Copie à : > Objet : [New post] Going to Waste > >WordPress.com theirishaesthete posted: ” An older set of stables on the former Dartrey estate in County Monaghan has already been shown here (see Now Unstable, October 1st 2014). While the rapidly deteriorating condition of that structure renders it most likely beyond redemption, the same is n”

    • Dear Mr Neuenschwander,
      Thank you for getting in contact and for your interest. You will appreciate that at present I do not have the resources to produce such a list. However, you can find information on some such buildings from an organisation called An Taisce which has produced a short list of key properties currently at risk. This can be seen at: http://www.antaisce.org/issues/buildings-at-risk
      The Irish Georgian Society is also working on such a project and I shall let you know if there is more information on this.
      Again, thank you for your interest and every good wish.

  4. Sarah says:

    Sir, What about Glyde Court in Co Louth? We tried to buy it 18 years ago but could not purchase any land to go with it. Habitable then, now a total ruin. Apropos the yard at Dartrey, I cannot believe the devastation, nor can I understand why the Forestry is not in duty bound to preserve it, nor bound to have taken care of the other stable yard now defunct. It was in reasonable condition when we visited Lady Edith in the early 70s, at that time, living in one of the lodges. Lady Edith was my husband’s aunt by marriage. He is buried in the Dartrey cemetary. And Stephenstown and Prospect House also in Co Louth? Nothing remains! Irish Heritage: who, if anyone, gives a damn? The Georgian Society is making some ephemeral effort – too late and to virtually, to no effect. In the UK, houses of note are preserved and stringent laws are in force regarding even internal alterations .In Ireland, ‘laissez faire’. You happen to own a very important piece of Archicture albeit Georgian, Victorian, Edwardine etc but what the hell! Just pull it down and claim insurance for fire or act of God.
    More to say, loads, but I am so despondent about the fact, that with no interest Government-wise, Ireland will become a nation of plastic houses.
    Best wishes,
    Sarah Windham

    • Thank you for getting in touch, even if your comments are rather dispiriting (albeit true). Glyde Court I have also written about on this site so you can find it if you look back over previous entries for County Louth: it is all but gone today I am afraid. In both cases, the properties are in private ownership and local/state authorities fail to enforce their own legislation, hence these buildings fall into dereliction and are lost forever, thereby diminishing the national patrimony. It is a sad state of affairs as you note, but very few people seem troubled. I would take issue with your remarks about the Irish Georgian Society which does, and has done, its best to help preserve Ireland’s architectural heritage but is limited by having very little funding – none from the state – and must raise what it can from supporters and friends.

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