For the Day That’s In It


A hipster St Patrick, as portrayed to one side of the east door at the Chapel Royal, Dublin Castle. The carving throughout this building was undertaken in the opening years of the 19th century by sculptor Edward Smyth working in conjunction with his son John (who took over all the work following Edward’s death in 1812). Note how the back of St Patrick’s mitre neatly elides into the arch behind him. Engaged in a face-off on the other side of the door – and likewise looking as though on a break from his real job as a barista – is Brian Boru, High King of Ireland before his death at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.


The Irish Aesthete sends St Patrick’s Day greetings to all friends and followers.

4 comments on “For the Day That’s In It

  1. claudius1889 says:

    To all Irishmen: Have a happy St. Patrick’s Day and congratulations for the victory over England at Twickenham, that made my day!!!

  2. clonmorlinn says:

    Love your blog for years now! To me it looks like Brian is bathed in the celestial light of a rainbow, and the church mitre is gobbling up what’s left (pun intended-old Ireland). best regards, RvR

    On Sat, Mar 17, 2018 at 12:31 AM The Irish Aesthete wrote:

    > theirishaesthete posted: ” A hipster St Patrick, as portrayed to one side > of the east door at the Chapel Royal, Dublin Castle. The carving throughout > this building was undertaken in the opening years of the 19th century by > sculptor Edward Smyth working in conjunction with his son” >

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