For Ardent Gardeners



To the north-east of the main house at Waterstown, County Westmeath stand the remains of what was once a very substantial walled garden, running to at least four acres. Certainly one of the largest extant examples of this horticultural form dating from the mid-18th century – although now in a very poor condition – the garden consists of a series of four ascending terraces, the outer walls constructed of rubble limestone lined internally of brick, the latter material also used for the terrace walls. Some of these have curved, or corrugated, sections (thereby offering additional shelter to tender plants) while others have infilled arches. That same device also features in the main entrance to the site, which takes the form of a brick-faced triumphal arch (with Diocletian window inserted into the pediment)  flanked by single-storey pavilions. If Waterstown was designed, as is generally the consensus, by Richard Castle then this walled garden must be attributed to him also; the entrance certainly displays just the right amount of eccentrically-used architectural motifs. Today the site is partially used as a farmyard but otherwise stands empty. 


3 comments on “For Ardent Gardeners

  1. CiaranH says:

    Robert , I live in Athlone and would love to restore this walled garden however i could not do this alone, I dont know if its too large to do this . what do you think.

    The plaque you missed it was a comment to the night of the big wind. im sure you got the pigeon tower also.

    • Thank you for getting in touch. The restoration of this important walled garden would be wonderful, but it is very large – and in private hands – so perhaps you ought to visit and talk to the owner?
      Meanwhile, yes I did see the commemorative plaque to the Big Wind, but can only give notice to so much here – and other elements of the former Waterstown estate interested me more…

  2. Deborah T. Sena says:

    See you are getting in line with the IGS’ upcoming series on Irish gardens. Congrats on being a part of it with your artist interviews.

Leave a Reply to Deborah T. Sena Cancel reply